Oakland A's at O.co Coliseum

From building materials to field dimensions, the O.co Coliseum is not quite like any other stadium I've seen. In part, this is because the coliseum is the only venue in America to currently host both NFL and MLB games. The Oakland Raiders play their games north to south, perpendicular to the direction of play for baseball, east to west. Given the field width (160 feet plus room for benches) needed to fit a football field into a baseball stadium, there is more foul territory in Oakland than in any other stadium. According to Park Factors, the foul territory makes O.co an "extreme pitcher's park," producing 78 home runs for every 100 hit at an average major league stadium. The liberal use of concrete, much of which is painted green and off-white, gives this stadium a funky, throw-back look few other stadiums have. In terms of building materials, the closest comparable stadium to O.co is probably Tropicana Field. 

The game I shot was on a Thursday at 12:35 p.m. In general, weekday games played during the day are less well-attended because many fans work a traditional 9-5 schedule. This generality held true at the A's game and many of the fans I met were diehards who maneuvered their schedules to be at most or all of the A's home games. These fans' commitment to the A's was impressive. Below, along with shots of the stadiums, are images of some of the diehards I met at the game. 

The A's dominated the Astros, never trailing in the game. Newly acquired pitcher Jeff Samardzija threw a gem of eight innings and one-run ball. 

Final Score: A's 13, Astros 1.

Ticket window. 

Ticket window. 

Walter, an usher in section 238, is a former aircraft electrician. The planes he worked on include the Ea6b, P3 and A3.

Walter, an usher in section 238, is a former aircraft electrician. The planes he worked on include the Ea6b, P3 and A3.

Fans wave flags in the left field bleachers. 

Fans wave flags in the left field bleachers. 

The ramp walls at the O.co Coliseum are concrete with a green painted stripe going through the middle. 

The ramp walls at the O.co Coliseum are concrete with a green painted stripe going through the middle. 

Season ticket holder Coco Fingers plays drums at A's games. He derives his game name from the combination of Rollie Fingers' mustache and Coco Crisp's hair. 

Season ticket holder Coco Fingers plays drums at A's games. He derives his game name from the combination of Rollie Fingers' mustache and Coco Crisp's hair. 

Paul Vossen of Santa Rosa and Richard Gawel of Adelaide, Australia drink wine before the game. It was Gawel's first game. 

Paul Vossen of Santa Rosa and Richard Gawel of Adelaide, Australia drink wine before the game. It was Gawel's first game. 

With the hills that lead to Redwood Regional Park in the background, a fan adjusts his cap.

With the hills that lead to Redwood Regional Park in the background, a fan adjusts his cap.

Evelyn Smith has been coming to games since 1972. She says that any day she is alive and gets to see a baseball game is a great day. All the players are her "sons," even opposing players.   

Evelyn Smith has been coming to games since 1972. She says that any day she is alive and gets to see a baseball game is a great day. All the players are her "sons," even opposing players.   

Lance Malone and his 7-year-old son Patrick, a catcher in little league, watch the game.

Lance Malone and his 7-year-old son Patrick, a catcher in little league, watch the game.

Jim, a season ticket holder, rests and watches the game on a television inside a large enclosed area on the plaza level behind home plate. Pictures of former A's greats hang on the walls. 

Jim, a season ticket holder, rests and watches the game on a television inside a large enclosed area on the plaza level behind home plate. Pictures of former A's greats hang on the walls. 

Larry has been coming to A's games since 1968, when the team moved to Oakland. He's built a contraption that latches onto a piece of the bleachers and keeps an umbrella above his head.  "I love the sun, but you bake," he said. "I used to hold an umbrella but I said there's got to be a better way." He remembers the 1970s fondly, recalling the "Hot Pants Day" promotion in which you were granted free entry to the game if you wore hot pants. 

Larry has been coming to A's games since 1968, when the team moved to Oakland. He's built a contraption that latches onto a piece of the bleachers and keeps an umbrella above his head.  "I love the sun, but you bake," he said. "I used to hold an umbrella but I said there's got to be a better way." He remembers the 1970s fondly, recalling the "Hot Pants Day" promotion in which you were granted free entry to the game if you wore hot pants. 

Pete, left, keeps score at all A's home games and in this game was posting a K on the railing for each strikeout recorded by an A's pitcher. He said he shares the "K" duty with other season ticket holders in Section 115. A manufacturing engineer for semiconductor company, Pete calls the scorecards a "nice souvenir" from the game. He brought along his friend Chuck, seated to his right. 

Pete, left, keeps score at all A's home games and in this game was posting a K on the railing for each strikeout recorded by an A's pitcher. He said he shares the "K" duty with other season ticket holders in Section 115. A manufacturing engineer for semiconductor company, Pete calls the scorecards a "nice souvenir" from the game. He brought along his friend Chuck, seated to his right.